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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
Hosted by Kevin Brant
Mark Builds a Biplane
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,297 posts
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Posted: Monday, May 13, 2019 - 05:39 PM UTC
Next to Natural Metal Finishes, there are fewer modelling challenges more scary than your first rigged biplane. So as part of the Learning to Fly campaign, I decided to face my fears and dive in on the Revell of Germany 1/72 Boeing Stearman Kaydet.

It's only 29 pieces, with only one marking option, so there's not too many chances to screw it up. Fortunately for a complete neophyte like me, Revell added (as an afterthought?) a guide to rigging the plane.
I started by fixing some of the most obvious issues. Lucky for me the ejector pins in the top wing were on the bottom. No so lucky for me the ejector pins are on the top of the bottom wing . I was able to punch some disks out of some 0.005" sheet I had on the bench.

And Revell couldn't avoid putting their mark on the kit.

I was able to chisel the marking off and sand it all back smooth.
Scrodes
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: July 22, 2012
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Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 04:27 AM UTC
Every day when I worked at the LHS


"Oh look dear - the plastic is color, so we don't need paint."

That poor little boy, I cannot save him without sounding like I'm just trying to sell something.


Or the look of skepticism when I'm asked "Do I need paint?" and I said yes
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 05:44 AM UTC
Hi Mark,

I've wanted to see one of these built. I will be watching.

Man, no wonder I never liked Revell for anything other than ships and 1/32 air: to think that as late as 1992 they would put ejector marks on visible surfaces, let alone their logo! Pathetic.

But so long as the detail and fit is good...
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,297 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 07:37 AM UTC
@Matt, I think the best answer starts with "It all depends on what you want to do." It's awfully easy to spend 3-4 times the original kit price on paint, PE, putty, glue, new decals, placard decals whatever. I don't think I applied paint to plastic for my first 3-4 years of modeling. This kit is clearly going to need paint, possibly several coats, including primer. And no telling what damage I will do trying to rig it.
@Fredrick, There's a good chance I'll finish this kit sooner or later. But if you want to see one finished nicely, check out B-17 Peter's (Peter Mollenhaur?) entry in Learning to Fly. The only way I could beat that is by having decent rigging.
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
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Posted: Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 05:22 PM UTC
OK a bit of progress.
I did a bit of prep work. Cleaned off the flash and did a little painting on the inside to hint at doped linen and aluminum on the interior.

I usually cut the pilots off of the sprue and heat up a pin to stick it into their butts for a handle while I'm painting them. In the spirit of this build, I'm trying something new. I super glued the crew to pieces of scrap shapes and I'm =using that for handles.

Revell's instructions call for the pilot's coveralls to be olive brown, not having access to Revell's paints in this corner of the world, I had to do a mad cross reference all over the web, finally decided on Model Master Israeli Armor SandGray. That didn't sound right, but from the looks of it, thispaint is a lot closer to sage green.

I'll probably need a second coat before it looks right.
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 04:22 PM UTC
SO to be upfront, I've never rigged a biplane before.
Not having any idea how to do it, I looked to that undeniable expert on everything, the Internet.

One guy suggested drilling deep holes in the top wing, shallow holes in the bottom wing. Then you carefully measure the distance between the holes and cut stretched sprue or a stiff wire just slightly longer than the measurement. You slip one end of the sprue into the deeper hole and let it fall into the shallower hold. Apply super glue and let cure. If it sags a bit, apply heat with a cigarette butt or a stick of incense to tighten it up. Seems like a lot of work, all the sprue stretching and measuring, then the heat seems a bit dodgy.

Someone else suggested drilling holes through both wings, then feeding fishing line thru the holes tying knots to hold the line in place. Finally supergluing the hole shut and sanding to match. Refinish the paint as needed. Seems like a dangerous proposition.

Finally found one that might work for me. Drill blind hole in the bottom of the top wing, drill thru holes in the bottom wing. Before mounting the top wings, superglue long strands of line into the top holes. Then mount the top wing. After it cures, thread the line through the bottom wings, pull tight, and add a weight to hold it taunt while you apply super glue and let it cure. Seems doable for the wings, lines to the fuselage might be a bit tricker. I'm thinking of leaving the interior (what little there is) out until after the lines are installed. Then I could use a hemostat to pull the lines out and hold them tight till the glue cures.

So using the wiring plan on the instructions, I've drilled out all of the holes with a 0.0135 (#80) bit. Since I'm using EZ Line, about 0.001" dia, I should be able to feed the line tru after painting.

Everything all drilled out:

Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 08:00 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Mark,

I've wanted to see one of these built. I will be watching.

Man, no wonder I never liked Revell for anything other than ships and 1/32 air: to think that as late as 1992 they would put ejector marks on visible surfaces, let alone their logo! Pathetic.

But so long as the detail and fit is good...



I think that 1992 was only the last time they refurbished the moulds. The kit itself has been around since at least 1966 and likely before that.
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 08:32 AM UTC
Scalemates agrees that the tooling was new in 1965. I can't tell if the mod mark is 1982 or 1992. I glued the fuselage together over the weekend, fit wasn't too bad, I should have done a little more to correct the fwd fuselage mating before I glued it up. The top side cleaned up nicely, the bottom had some molded in offsets and didn't fit too well. The aft fuselage looked good till I highlighted it and there's a rough edge all along the seam. Hope to get some photos up 2 nite.
AussieReg
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
#007
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Victoria, Australia
Joined: June 09, 2009
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 04:37 PM UTC
Adventures in rigging, another modelling skill I need to work on before I tackle my Sopwith Camel!

Following along with much interest Mark, and I agree with the course you are taking based on my interweb Googling!

Cheers, D
md72
#439
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Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,297 posts
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 06:44 PM UTC
Got the fuselage together and started cleaning up the joint.

Front Cowling is OK, aft needs work
Bottom cowling is terrible, the rest is manageable.