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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
raypalmer
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 08:38 AM GMT+7
Hahah, I was dubious that was correct. I had no idea the b17 used corrugation under the skin! Great question!

Okay. On the topic of Boeing. They have employed many very interesting techniques and materials over the years. But also employed some interesting and unique employees. Who am I thinking of?
rdt1953
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Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 05:41 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Junkers J1?



Richard - We have a winner ! Dr. Junkers pioneered the use of corrugated metal panels running SPANWISE in the J 1 with smooth panels overlaid Chordwise for the exterior skin . This structure was used much later by Boeing in the B 17 .
Over to you -
raypalmer
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Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 02:05 AM GMT+7
Junkers J1?
rdt1953
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Posted: Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 10:50 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Hi Richard

Seeing as nobody else has answered yet, I'll throw myself on the sacrificial fire with the Boeing 247. If nothing else, it'll cross one contender off the list. ;

All the best

Rowan



Hi Rowan - thanks for keeping this alive but no, that's not it - have to look earlier than the 247 , different manufacturer and foreign to boot !
Richard
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
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#017
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Posted: Saturday, September 16, 2017 - 08:53 AM GMT+7
Hi Richard

Seeing as nobody else has answered yet, I'll throw myself on the sacrificial fire with the Boeing 247. If nothing else, it'll cross one contender off the list. ;

All the best

Rowan
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 - 10:06 PM GMT+7
Bump bump
rdt1953
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 10:54 AM GMT+7

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The " air conditioning" would be "air pressure" - in that atmosphere the pilot would need a pressure suit to survive.



DING DING DING! We have a winner!


Thanks Jessie but drat! I was hoping to avoid coming up with another question.

Here goes - What aircraft pioneered the type of wing construction used by Boeing on the B 17 and in what way ? ( other than both were cantilevered mid wing monoplanes)
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 10:19 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

The " air conditioning" would be "air pressure" - in that atmosphere the pilot would need a pressure suit to survive.



DING DING DING! We have a winner!
rdt1953
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 03:40 AM GMT+7

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He turns on the air con..............Sorry, couldn't resist



You're more nearly correct than you may think, for certain values of "air conditioning"


The " air conditioning" would be " air pressure" - in that atmosphere the pilot would need a pressure suit to survive.
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 03:01 AM GMT+7
Water on the body surface will boil off, drying the skin. The air conditioning would be a suit that controls the humidity to keep the body surface(skin) from drying out.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 12:24 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

He turns on the air con..............Sorry, couldn't resist



You're more nearly correct than you may think, for certain values of "air conditioning"
brandydoguk
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Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 01:08 AM GMT+7

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Quoted Text


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An altitude that atmospheric pressure allows water to boil at 98.6 deg Fahrenheit or 37 deg Celsius.



Yes, which means...



The water in your body will boil ? Yikes !



And the implications for a pilot are...



He turns on the air con..............Sorry, couldn't resist
Jessie_C
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Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 12:46 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

An altitude that atmospheric pressure allows water to boil at 98.6 deg Fahrenheit or 37 deg Celsius.



Yes, which means...



The water in your body will boil ? Yikes !



And the implications for a pilot are...
rdt1953
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 02:22 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

An altitude that atmospheric pressure allows water to boil at 98.6 deg Fahrenheit or 37 deg Celsius.



Yes, which means...



The water in your body will boil ? Yikes !
Jessie_C
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 01:06 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

An altitude that atmospheric pressure allows water to boil at 98.6 deg Fahrenheit or 37 deg Celsius.



Yes, which means...
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 11:52 AM GMT+7
An altitude that atmospheric pressure allows water to boil at 98.6 deg Fahrenheit or 37 deg Celsius.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 11:19 AM GMT+7
When last we tuned in, I asked about the Kármán line. Now another altitude-related question:

What is the significance of the Armstrong Line?
brandydoguk
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 10:26 AM GMT+7
That's right Jessica, it was eventually realised that the damaged areas on returning planes showed these areas had adequate strength. Therefore it must be the other areas on the aircraft that were vulnerable.

Over to you.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 04:26 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Thanks Richard, that took some finding.

In WW2 the US Army Air Force conducted a study aimed at reducing losses in combat. They recorded the battle damage on returning aircraft and looked at where they were most frequently hit, the idea being to increase protection to those areas.

What was the basic flaw in this approach?



Those aircraft were the ones which returned, so by definition weren't hit in the most vulnerable areas. The ones that were didn't come back.
brandydoguk
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:52 AM GMT+7
Sorry Darrell, that's not it.
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 - 03:26 AM GMT+7
Adding extra weight due to the reinforcement called for in the study.
brandydoguk
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Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 - 07:08 PM GMT+7
Thanks Richard, that took some finding.

In WW2 the US Army Air Force conducted a study aimed at reducing losses in combat. They recorded the battle damage on returning aircraft and looked at where they were most frequently hit, the idea being to increase protection to those areas.

What was the basic flaw in this approach?
rdt1953
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Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 - 10:35 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Did he use control cables that had some elasticity in them?



Hi Martin - You ,sir are the winner ! The control cables were reduced in diameter and some other components i ( likely belcranks, control arms ,etc ) had their mass pared away so all were stiff enough to produce full range of control surface movement at lower speeds but stretched/ deflected progressively as speeds and the attendant loads on the control surfaces increased . The net effect was progressive reduction in control surface movement relative to control ( stick) input.
While there were two fatal crashes of the Zero prototypes during initial testing- the first due to the failure of the elevator mass balance and the second due to aileron flutter traced to aileron force balance tabs - there was never any failure of the elastic linkages of the control systems in the service life of the aircraft .
Over to you Martin !
brandydoguk
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Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 - 02:46 AM GMT+7
Did he use control cables that had some elasticity in them?
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 10:52 PM GMT+7
I believe tabs act for fine trim and in some applications act as force balances.
What I am looking for is Horikoshi's elegantly simple ( in concept at least - execution may have been not so easy) system for progressively changing the ratio of control input to control surface movement as airspeed increased.