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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 01:28 PM GMT+7
Yeah-- we gotta keep it going-- Bump over to Mark?
VR, Russ
pigsty
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Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 07:36 AM GMT+7
If it helps, I'm definitely interested in this thread. Especially if a new question should turn up!
U-mark
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Posted: Friday, January 05, 2018 - 12:12 PM GMT+7
Thanks Russ, I lived, still do, close to Selfridge air base here in the Detroit area. In the sixties the 94th FIS was stationed there and then in the mid to late seventies the 171st FIS of the Mich ANG flew some of the most beautifully marked 106's in the inventory. Of course I may be a little biased on that point. Even after the the 171st transitioned to F-4D's ( another beautifully marked aircraft) and then to F-16's the low flying aircraft signs around the base still featured the 106 silhouette. I believe there was another squadron based there also, Detroit was considered a prime target back in those days.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Friday, January 05, 2018 - 05:45 AM GMT+7
Glad you all enjoyed that multi-part question, I had feared the thread was winding down but the detailed responses tell me I was wrong-- hopefully we can keep them going! Mark-- I did have a slight advantage when it comes to the F-106, since I don't live to far from the original record breaker of a sort-- it was SN 56-0459 flown by Maj. Joe Rogers in the 1959 record attempt, but it developed some avionics problems and was replaced. It now sits in the Air Park at McChord Field in Washington State, adorned in 318 FIS markings. Joe Rogers record of 1,525 MPH was exceeded by civilian test pilot Charles Meyers in a different F106 shortly thereafter at 1,544 MPH, which is about Mach 2.4, not bad for a stock fighter. The top speed of the F106 was never really determined for sure, but it was an incredible airplane-- the thing could go almost straight up To 30,000 feet in less than 30 seconds-- and it could be vectored to a target and its weapons fired from ground control (when everything worked right). Here's a link to an article I wrote about the Air Park at McChord, with some photos of the F102 and F106-- my second and third favorite jets-- after the F104.
http://www.largescaleplanes.com/articles/article.php?aid=3151
VR, Russ
U-mark
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Posted: Friday, January 05, 2018 - 04:55 AM GMT+7
I'll do the best I can, but I'll have to do a little research. I got lucky on this one, I grew up close to a base that had an f-106 squadron stationed on it, it was always one of my favorite planes along with the B-58.The Convair deltas are one of the few aviation subjects I have some knowledge about. What i used to like about the six was at takeoff the pilot would select full afterburner and the engine would wind down, almost like the pilot killed the throttle, before the burner lit off with a loud bang and off she went. I will see what i can come up with but in the mean time if anyone else has a question they want to pose, feel free.
AussieReg
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#007
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Posted: Friday, January 05, 2018 - 02:14 AM GMT+7
Great question Russ, had me stumped and trolling the Google machine for quite a while.

Looking forward to what brain-teaser Mark can come up with!

Cheers, D
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 04:22 PM GMT+7
Mark-- you've got it. The "family" are the four Convair deltas. The mentioned missile/launch vehicle is the Convair Atlas-- which culminated in the Atlas-Centuar program just a few years ago. The Douglas F4D Skyray was the only other operational (production) US delta jet, and held the speed record for a carrier based aircraft for a short while. The four Convair delta designs stemmed from Lippish's research, and the ME 163 was the German design which first saw operational use (and holds the WWII aircraft speed record), although it was not a pure "delta" aircraft, having more swept wings. The design features of course being the delta wings and absence of "tail" stabilizers. Britain and France of course had deltas-- the Vulcan and Mirage are the most noteworthy for the same time period. In 1959 the F-106 broke the speed record for an operational (production) single seat, single engine aircraft (the Russians beat it with the YE-152, but that was a prototype test aircraft similar to the Mig-21). The F-106 and F-102 were designed solely as interceptors, (not all-purpose fighters). The later F-106 could be controlled via ground control, and as such it was the first single seat interceptor to be controlled from the ground in supersonic flight when it traveled from Palmdale CA to Jacksonville Florida in 3.5 hours, with the pilot in control for a total of five minutes during landing and take off only. Convair was taken over by General Dynamics, McDonnell-Douglas, and finally Lockheed. Just to correct the record, several F-102's were lost in combat during the Vietnam War (at least one in air-to-air combat, and two others to ground fire). During the Greek-Turkish Cyprus conflict, both the Greeks and Turks flew and probably lost F102s in air-to-air combat(but both countries deny any losses). For a while in 1960, Convair had the three fastest aircraft types in the world-- the F-106, the B-58, and the Convair 880 civilian airliner. OK-- over to you now!
VR, Russ
U-mark
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 02:07 PM GMT+7
I forgot to mention the bomber would be the B-24, designed and built by Consolidated Aircraft which merged with Vultee to become Convair. Now owned by Boeing.
U-mark
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 01:04 PM GMT+7
Here is my guess. The company is Convair. The aircraft are the F-102 Delta Dagger, F-106 Delta Dart, F2Y Sea Dart, and the B-58 Hustler. All four used delta wings and elevons. The F-106 still holds the speed record for (production) single engine fighters, the B-58 holds the speed record for LA to New York. The F-102 was deployed to Vietnam for a time but probably never saw combat except for some stories of pilots picking up campfires under the jungle canopy with their IR sensor and shooting Falcons at them. I'm a bit stumped by the name of the Douglas aircraft, the only one I can think of is the Skyray.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 11:17 AM GMT+7
Folks-- I got to thinking about the "record holder" part of the question, and realized I wasn't to clear about it-- there are actually two different types of records involved, one was a flight between two cities, (the one I'm thinking about) the other was a record which has yet to be passed on a course (another clue for you) by the same type of operational aircraft in its specific category. Another hint for you is the only aircraft to exceed the record in a similar category was Russian, but that aircraft was a test aircraft which never flew operationally. Somebody ought to get it now!
VR, Russ
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 07:09 AM GMT+7
Richard-- it's nice to know this thread is still alive! I thought for a while I was the only US guy interested- what with Karl, Darrell and Jessie speaking the Queen's English and all (well, not really for our two fellow N. Americans!) I guess we easily distracted colonials haven't fully given up yet on this thread! The answer to your question is---you are going down the right track, but there's still more to the question (but it's enough to likely lead to the answers). In fact, since I added bonus points for the test aircraft and the Douglas contemporary (in an attempt to steer folks the right way), it's only fair to include bonus points for the manufacturer's vehicle that kept giving long after the manufacturer was broken up! With this particular manufacturer there are so many "firsts", that it's a great pick for questions.
VR, Russ
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 06:10 AM GMT+7
Russ - I hope a partial answer doesn't screw up your thread - honeycombed structure tells me Convair B 58 Hustler which , IIRC , set a transcontinental record - the common trait must be Delta wing . .???
Richard
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 05:06 AM GMT+7
Jessie,
Nope, not the F104 (but that's my favorite jet aircraft-- you gotta love a missile with a man in it-- and as a tank officer in Germany in 1979, I was low level buzzed by a Luftwaffe F104--it was quite an experience). The aircraft "family" I'm thinking of consists of four separate aircraft types with a common feature made by the same manufacturer. The manufacturer does not exist today (except as a division of another company, and they were making other types of vehicles--some of which continued to remain operational long after the manufacturer ceased to exist as a single entity). The four aircraft (including the one that never became operational) had the same two flying surface design traits (I guess some might call this a single trait, but it's really two, as other aircraft manufacturers have occasionally used one, or both of these design features on aircraft). I'll add a few more clues: Two of the three operational aircraft were designed for a single specific purpose. But only one of the entire "family" was documented as being used in combat, and not entirely for the purpose it was designed. And of the three operational aircraft types, one of them incorporated a "honeycomb" structure in the wing without the use of conventional stringers. As far as the "record" setting goes, several other aircraft types have broken similar records, but not in the specific, narrow category of the aircraft type.
VR, Russ
Jessie_C
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Posted: Thursday, January 04, 2018 - 03:27 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Darrell,
Nope, not a canard, but the prototype of this family did have a flying surface that was the first of its kind, and it was in turn based on previous designs that never came to complete fruition except for one operational type that had some limited success during WWII. There are similar aircraft designs that do have a canard, but not in this particular "family". Here's another clue-- Douglas was a competitor with a similar design that broke a speed record in level flight-- bonus points if anyone can figure out that aircraft too.
VR, Russ



You're looking for Lockheed's Starfighter and the Douglas design was the X-3.
Now let's see...

Quoted Text

1) Name the three "operational" aircraft that were in this "family" (just the basic three, not the multitude of variants). There's a fourth, but it did not go beyond test phase--bonus "points" if you can name the fourth.


F-104A/C the basic USAF interceptor;
F-104B/D the two seat combat-capable trainer;
F-104G and variants, the NATO strike version;
Lockheed Lancer F-15 competitor.

Quoted Text

2) Name the manufacturer, and two of the design features making their four aircraft in this "family" unique during their time.


Do I have to say Lockheed again? Razor thin straight wings and mach-2 capable fixed inlets (this is much more difficult to achieve than one might think. Most mach 2 inlets have more hydraulic actuators than the rest of the aircraft).

Quoted Text

3) Name which of the aircraft is the record holder.


NF-104A rocket boosted "spacecraft trainer".

Quoted Text

4) Name the two cities involved in the setting of the record.


I can't find anything about cities. The F-104 Records page doesn't list any.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 - 04:15 PM GMT+7
Darrell,
Nope, not a canard, but the prototype of this family did have a flying surface that was the first of its kind, and it was in turn based on previous designs that never came to complete fruition except for one operational type that had some limited success during WWII. There are similar aircraft designs that do have a canard, but not in this particular "family". Here's another clue-- Douglas was a competitor with a similar design that broke a speed record in level flight-- bonus points if anyone can figure out that aircraft too.
VR, Russ
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 - 03:50 PM GMT+7
Could it be aircraft with canard wings?
Kevlar06
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Posted: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 - 03:39 AM GMT+7
Karl,
Nope, not a whirlybird. Perhaps I made it too vague. This is a "family" of related aircraft designs by one manufacturer, but each is a separate type. Here's another clue--- The same design (albeit with different technologies and slightly different characteristics) has been used by German, British and French manufacturers over the years.
VR, Russ
Heatnzl
#435
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 08:11 PM GMT+7
Helicopters, perchance?

Cheers

Karl.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 05:53 PM GMT+7
Nope, not the 777. The aircraft family I'm thinking about has a different heritage. Just to clarify, the aircraft are different types with similar configuration.
VR, Russ
Heatnzl
#435
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 05:42 PM GMT+7
I will go with the Boeing 777.
The 777-200
The 777-200ER
The 777-200LR
Boeing introduced digital fly-by-wire controls and LCD glass cockpit flight displays and was the first commercial aircraft designed entirely by computer.
The record for longest nonstop flight by a commercial airliner is held by a 777-LR for a flight from Hong Kong to London.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 07:07 AM GMT+7
Well, here goes-- we'll see if there's any continuing interest in this string: I'm thinking of a family of operational aircraft (as opposed to test or prototype) with two notable design characteristics, and a record which hasn't been broken:

1) Name the three "operational" aircraft that were in this "family" (just the basic three, not the multitude of variants). There's a fourth, but it did not go beyond test phase--bonus "points" if you can name the fourth.
2) Name the manufacturer, and two of the design features making their four aircraft in this "family" unique during their time.
3) Name which of the aircraft is the record holder.
4) Name the two cities involved in the setting of the record.

It may seem more difficult than it is, but a single correct answer will likely lead to all the answers--and I've provided lots of clues in the wording. Here's one more clue-- the aircraft manufacturer is distantly "related" to one of the most famous WWII bombers, and still has strong ties to the US Space program today.

VR, Russ
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 04:46 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Thats it Russ. I said it would be an easy question. I find it fairly easy to come up with the answers to questions but difficult to come up with hard questions.



Well, at 192 pages of posts so far, maybe this post has run its course for interest and should be retired? I'll give it one more shot though-- I have a question in mind but want to make sure it hasn't been asked yet-- so I'll skim some of the postings (I'm certainly not reading them all!). If it hasn't been asked, I'll put it up!
VR, Russ
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 02:38 AM GMT+7
Thats it Russ. I said it would be an easy question. I find it fairly easy to come up with the answers to questions but difficult to come up with hard questions.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Monday, January 01, 2018 - 05:14 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text


An easy double question. What is it and who makes it?. (Still in planning stage)




That's the DARPA Aerial Reconfigurable Embedded Sytem (ARES) ducted fan tilt wing concept aircraft, which began with the DARPA TX transport vehicle competition. That particular version is the Lockheed-Martin entry for the competition, but AAI, and Piasecki were also competitors with similar aircraft proposals. The idea behind this system is that it can be configured for a variety of loads, with a tilt rotor wing system, similar to the concept behind the CH54 Tarhee modular load helicopter. Some of the concept aircraft in the TX competition initially were going to be designed to be able to transfer the wing and control module to various loads, such as a light vehicle or weapon system. ARES is remotely piloted/programmable, and can carry separate medical, logistical or intelligence gathering "modules". It's small enough and maneuverable enough (about a 3000 lb payload) to be utilized in the resupply of front line troops in difficult landing zones, with the abililty to convert from vertical to high speed horizontal flight rapidly.
VR, Russ
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Monday, January 01, 2018 - 04:10 PM GMT+7

An easy double question. What is it and who makes it?. (Still in planning stage)