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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
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Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 - 01:55 AM UTC
At last! The chocolate fish goes to Drabslab
drabslab
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European Union
Joined: September 28, 2004
KitMaker: 2,121 posts
AeroScale: 1,572 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 11:26 PM UTC
Cessna YH-41
Jessie_C
_VISITCOMMUNITY
British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
AeroScale: 5,898 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 12:48 PM UTC
Another hint: The name is not commonly associated with helicopters at all, but that doesn't mean it's not well known.
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 02:55 AM UTC
Time for another hint: The company makes spam cans.
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
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Posted: Monday, July 09, 2018 - 02:27 AM UTC
The one I'm after flew 8577 feet higher, and nearly 10 years later.
c4willy
#305
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Christchurch, New Zealand
Joined: February 01, 2006
KitMaker: 1,530 posts
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Posted: Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 09:16 PM UTC
Sikorshky S-52-1? Maximum height 21,220 feet (6,468mtrs).
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
AeroScale: 5,898 posts
Posted: Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 01:09 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Piasecki YH-21?



Sorry, not an H-21, but you've got the general time period correct.
Berwickboy
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England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
Joined: April 27, 2013
KitMaker: 445 posts
AeroScale: 382 posts
Posted: Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 09:00 AM UTC
Piasecki YH-21?
Jessie_C
_VISITCOMMUNITY
British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
AeroScale: 5,898 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 07, 2018 - 05:54 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Easy, you say ... ?

Can you give us a clue?



Okay, it was manufactured by not one of the famous names in the helicopter business.

Darrel, it appears that Aero Sensing does low-level work.

Sorry Gary, not an MI-4
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
Joined: February 03, 2014
KitMaker: 924 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 07, 2018 - 02:33 PM UTC
Mi-4 Hound?
2002hummer
#257
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: October 11, 2011
KitMaker: 633 posts
AeroScale: 365 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 07, 2018 - 02:13 PM UTC
is it Aero Sensing,Inc. out of Osaka City Japan?


pigsty
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United Kingdom
Joined: January 16, 2007
KitMaker: 1,173 posts
AeroScale: 592 posts
Posted: Saturday, July 07, 2018 - 07:14 AM UTC
Easy, you say ... ?

Can you give us a clue?
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
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Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 - 06:01 AM UTC
This ought to be easy. What was the last piston-engine helicopter to hold the altitude record?
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,927 posts
AeroScale: 549 posts
Posted: Thursday, June 28, 2018 - 06:00 AM UTC
I suspected a Canadian would get this one! Right on Jessie! Over to you-- but first, some more Barker trivia-- Barker is an interesting character, and the most decorated Canadian in the History of warfare to boot. (And one of three Commonwealth pilots to be the most decorated WWI flyers, the other two being McCudden and Mannock). There is a new book out on him--- Barker, VC, which I understand is a pretty good read. He did something no other commonwealth pilot was allowed to do-- he was quite a hunter and marksman (out of necessity) in his youth, so he marked his kills by painting white "notches" on the forward outboard interplane strut of B6313-- likely the first WWI pilot to do so, and it was highly frowned upon by the RFC and RAF of WWI. He also stole the radiator cap ornament of an Italian car (misappropriated) for his right hand gun that he used as a sighting aid-- it was a little red devil, and he removed it and placed it on his Snipe when he went back to France in October 1918. After serving 10 months in Italy, where he gained most of his "kills", he was sent back to England, and allowed a 10 day "trip" to France where he earned his V.C. One other fact-- he was awarded the V.C. In 1919 for his action in October 1918, and not earlier because he was so badly wounded he couldn't walk the few feet for the ceremony. And after earning the V.C., he received a bill from the Air Ministry for the Chronometer he took from B6313-- that's gratitude for you! Darn pencil pushers! Even after he left 28 Squadron, he took his beloved B6313 with him, although his new command flew The F2B. B6313 went through five paint jobs:
1) Bare metal cowl, white wheel covers & cone de' penetration, white square with "1c" in three positions
2) Black cowl, black wheel covers, "N" Squadron symbol
3) Drab or Black cowl, alternating black & white fuselage stripe in a narrow band around fuselage, red heart with arrow leaning rearward on the tail
4) Black cowl, wide Black & White band, medium green tail with the heart motif leaning forward.
5) Bare metal cowl, wide black & white fuselage band, green tail with red hart/arrow leaning forward. (This aircraft was significantly modified, whith most of the upper wing fabric cut away over the cockpit, and four cooling holes cut in the cowl.
Here's an article on my two (fittingly Canadian) Hobbycraft Camels made to look like Barkers first and last markings for his beloved B6313:
https://www.largescaleplanes.com/articles/article.php?aid=3147

VR, Russ
Jessie_C
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 03, 2009
KitMaker: 6,600 posts
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Posted: Thursday, June 28, 2018 - 05:17 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Ok, I'm going to reach back-- way back, in time. To the dawn of aviation history in fact, all the way to the aviation history of the First World War. I'd like the name of the pilot, the aircraft he flew, and the aircraft serial along with a couple of "bonus" facts to complete the answer. Here goes:

1) What famous allied pilot flew the same aircraft (with few exceptions) from September 1917 to September 1918?

2) What was the type and serial number of the aircraft?

3) This aircraft went through five iterations of marking and two modifications peculiar only to this particular aircraft. Can you name one of the two modifications?

4) Finally, bonus points to the individual who can name the item this pilot "misappropriated" for his aircraft, And the other item he "misappropriated" from this aircraft when he finally left it.

5) Double bonus points to the individual who can name what this pilot did to his aircraft that was highly frowned upon by the nation he was flying for.

As not to make it too difficult, the pilot is well known, is not British, American, French, Italian, Australian, New Zealander or Russian, and survived the war to be awarded very high honors, but not while flying this particular aircraft.

Have at it!
VR, Russ






Okay, here goes:

1) LCol William Barker, VC, DSO*, MC**, SMMV(Italy), CDG (France)

2) Sopwith Camel B6313

3) Large areas of the upper centre section cut away; extra cooling slots in the cowling; Ring and bead rifle type gun sight fitted

4) "Little red devil" radiator cap mascot on the right-hand Vickers gun. He took the clock after it was dismantled, and was asked to return it shortly afterward.

5) Canada frowned upon personal markings of any sort. How dare a soldier be so insubordinate as to deface Government property?

Extra bonus, entirely unasked for answer: Barker's most famous action took place between himself flying a Snipe against approximately 15 Fokker D.VIIs of Jagdgruppe 12 on October 27, 1918. The result? Barker: 3 Jagdgruppe 12: 0 (well, he had to crash-land in the trenches, so perhaps we'll be fair and award them 1/2)
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,927 posts
AeroScale: 549 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 02:05 PM UTC
Gary nope, good answer and Beachamp-Proctor might have known this other pilot. I forgot to include that the pilot Im thinking of is not from South Africa, India, Japan, French Morroco or Belgium either. I often forget these countries were supporters or in the Allied effort. Ill give another clue the pilot and his aircraft Im thinking about spent less time in combat flying on the Western Front than he did on another front, but the action hes most famous for was flown in a different aircraft type on the Western Front (Im sure Ive muddied up the waters pretty good with this clue, well see).
VR, Russ
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
Joined: February 03, 2014
KitMaker: 924 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 11:31 AM UTC
I'm hoping you are referring to Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor from South Africa?

Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,927 posts
AeroScale: 549 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 10:28 AM UTC
Ok, I'm going to reach back-- way back, in time. To the dawn of aviation history in fact, all the way to the aviation history of the First World War. I'd like the name of the pilot, the aircraft he flew, and the aircraft serial along with a couple of "bonus" facts to complete the answer. Here goes:

1) What famous allied pilot flew the same aircraft (with few exceptions) from September 1917 to September 1918?

2) What was the type and serial number of the aircraft?

3) This aircraft went through five iterations of marking and two modifications peculiar only to this particular aircraft. Can you name one of the two modifications?

4) Finally, bonus points to the individual who can name the item this pilot "misappropriated" for his aircraft, And the other item he "misappropriated" from this aircraft when he finally left it.

5) Double bonus points to the individual who can name what this pilot did to his aircraft that was highly frowned upon by the nation he was flying for.

As not to make it too difficult, the pilot is well known, is not British, American, French, Italian, Australian, New Zealander or Russian, and survived the war to be awarded very high honors, but not while flying this particular aircraft.

Have at it!
VR, Russ


Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,927 posts
AeroScale: 549 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 07:56 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Bullseye Russ.



Purely accidental. I happened to be researching ducted fan motors in helicopters last month, and came across a paper model aircraft site which used sources in Australia that referenced a flying version of this "weirdo"! If it hadn't been for that, I'd have been scratching my head. When I worked in a LHS several years ago, we had a customer who was heavily into building DFMs power plants for his styrofoam and paper "jet" aircraft. He'd built an RC F-86 completely out of styrofoam scraps, paper card, and a lightweight plastic tube, using the motors from a cheap RC drone. It flew beautifully, without jet noise though. He introduced me to an entire RC industry using these DFMs that I never new existed. Give me a few days to come up with an equally difficult question (this one would have been really hard had I not been doing research into DFMs already!).
VR, Russ
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
Joined: February 03, 2014
KitMaker: 924 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 05:32 AM UTC
Bullseye Russ.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,927 posts
AeroScale: 549 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 02:57 AM UTC
It's the Stipa-Camproni ducted fan test aircraft. Designed by Luigi Stipa and built by Camproni in the 1930s to test the concept of a "propellor-in-a-tube" for propulsion-- it was the first "ducted fan" propelled aircraft. Some attribute Stipa with the invention of the turbo-fan jet engine with this design, but that's a bit of a stretch. Basically it was a large tube with wings, and had a motor suspended inside the tube and a prop at the front just outside the tube which pulled air through the tube, thereby achieving forward thrust. What I find interesting in this design is that it has been used recently in powering RC aircraft designed to look like jets using similar electric powered ducted fan motors. Similar applications were used in other experimental aircraft like the Bell X-22 and are used in directional thrust vectoring in some helicopters today. Slow speed and low noise are two of the hallmarks of this aircraft.
VR, Russ
brandydoguk
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England - North, United Kingdom
Joined: October 04, 2002
KitMaker: 1,493 posts
AeroScale: 643 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 12:05 AM UTC
Is it the prototype Hasegawa egg plane?

Seriously I've no idea but it is a great question.
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
Joined: February 03, 2014
KitMaker: 924 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Monday, June 25, 2018 - 08:06 PM UTC
What is this and what was its purpose?



Gary
Heatnzl
#435
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Nelson, New Zealand
Joined: February 14, 2013
KitMaker: 456 posts
AeroScale: 454 posts
Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2018 - 09:04 PM UTC

Quoted Text

To allow ground clearance for the prop?


You have it.

gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
Joined: February 03, 2014
KitMaker: 924 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2018 - 08:58 PM UTC
To allow ground clearance for the prop?