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In-Box Review
172
P-51 Mustang
P-51 Mustang
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by: Kevin Brant [ SGTRAM ]

Introduction

The Excalibur III, a P-51C, piloted by Capt. Charles F. Blair in 1951, flew non-stop from New York to London in 8 hours. Four months later he flew non-stop from Norway to Alaska in just over 10 hours. The aircraft that Capt Blair had flown was purchased from A. Paul Mantz in 1949. Mr. Mantz had converted the aircraft for long distance aircraft racing, winning the Bendix air race with the P-51C in 1946 and 1947, with the aircraft named Blaze of Noon.

Hasegawa has released a kit in 1/72 scale that covers both aircraft.

Contents

7 Plastic Sprues(two aircraft)
2 Clear Plastic Sprue
1 Small Resin Sprue
1 Decal Sheet
1 Instruction Sheets

Review

Opening the box, you will find two bags of parts, each containing plastic parts for a P-51C, meaning the kit contains parts for two separate P-51C's. The parts are molded in light grey plastic, and an inspection of the sprues shows some nice moldings. The aircraft contain fine engraved panel lines and some nice looking surface details. On the plastic parts I found no real flash to be concerned with, nor sink marks. As for the clear plastic, they are well molded, clear with no visible discoloration in my sample, but the canopy frame while seen, is not raised, so some extra work will be required for masking.

The kit does include three resin parts for creating the modified transition between the fuselage and tail fin. Those parts do contain some flash, and will need some extra care to clean up.

Looking at the overall interior detail, the cockpit detail is pretty scant, with just a seat, stick, and instrument panel. But a decal is provided for the instrument panel. As for the wheel wells, there is some nice looking molded details, but in my opinion, they do not look deep enough, so if closing the wheels was a thought, some work would be required.

The instructions do look to be well laid out, with construction spread over eight steps. The steps look to be clear and should be easy to follow. One thing to know, is that the transition part from the fuselage to the tail fin, while cast in resin, is identified as a metal part. Also, provided is the option for either the Hamilton Standard or Aero Products propeller that should be noted on which aircraft you are building. There are paint call-outs throughout the instructions.

The painting and marking schemes for both aircrarft are included, stating both aircraft are painted red. The decals look to be very well printed, all in register and crisp.

Overview

Overall this looks like a great kit from Hasegawa, the bonus of two aircraft in the same kit. The story and history behind this P-51C is very interesting and is couple with some good looking moldings. While the cockpit does look a little bare, it is not bad for a 1/72 scale kit. Resin parts are included to complete the conversion to a racer, and they should should both build into two planes represent the single plane from history. I would recommend the kit.

SUMMARY
Highs: Great subject, good molding, engraved panel lines
Lows: Scant detailed cockpit
Verdict: Great kit with two planes covering the same aircraft in history, highly recommended.
  Scale: 1:72
  Mfg. ID: 02215
  PUBLISHED: Sep 03, 2017
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 88.35%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 86.04%

Our Thanks to Hobbico!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.
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About Kevin Brant (SgtRam)
FROM: ONTARIO, CANADA

I am an IT Consultant and father, with a passion for plastic models. I mostly prefer 1/35 Armor and 1/48 Aircraft. My main interests are anything Canadian, as well as WW2 German and British Armor and Aircraft. I have been building models since I was a young kid, got away from it for awhile, but r...

Copyright 2017 text by Kevin Brant [ SGTRAM ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.


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Comments

I thought this one looked at bit familiar so I did a search in my archive, and found these two of Excalibur taken in Norway in 1951. I do not know it this is at Bardufoss, or somewhere else in Norway before his flight. Kjell Arne
SEP 04, 2017 - 05:19 AM
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